Gluten Intolerance vs. Celiac | Identify the Type, Symptoms

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gluten intolerance vs. celiac

It is not a new health concern, but people are more aware of allergies. There are some close differences in identifying gluten intolerance vs. celiac disease. Hence, if anyone finds themselves in a close fix, understanding both would help identify the problem and be on the road to a solution.

The allergy includes diseases like wheat allergy, celiac disease, and non-celiac gluten sensitivity. The symptoms and interactions vary in each person, and indications are not very distinct in gluten intolerance vs. celiac vs. wheat allergy.  

We will discuss some of the symptoms of these diseases, identify gluten intolerance vs. celiac, and how they affect the human body.

gluten intolerance vs. celiac

Celiac Disease

Gluten intolerance, also termed celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity, can have a major impact on a person’s lifestyle and health. Here are some ways in which gluten intolerance can affect an individual:

  1. Digestive problems: Gluten intolerance can be identified with symptoms such as bloating, abdominal pain, diarrhea, and constipation. These symptoms can be uncomfortable and can affect a person’s ability to go about their daily routine.
  2. Nutritional deficiencies: Gluten intolerance can influence the absorption of nutrients in the small intestine, which then leads to deficiencies in vitamins and minerals. As a result, it instigates a range of health problems, such as anemia, osteoporosis, and a weakened immune system.
  3. Social isolation: People with gluten intolerance may find it taxing to socialize with others who do not comprehend their dietary restrictions. It can be complicated to attend social gatherings, restaurants, and parties, which can lead to feelings of isolation and exclusion.
  4. Emotional stress: Living with a chronic condition like gluten intolerance can be emotionally challenging. It can be testing to manage a limited diet and deal with symptoms that may not always be under control.
  5. Increased healthcare costs: People with gluten intolerance may need to see a doctor more often than those without the condition. They may also need to purchase costly gluten-free products, which evidently spike healthcare costs.

Symptoms of Celiac Disease

The symptoms of celiac disease can vary widely from person to person. It is common to mistake celiac vs. gluten intolerance. Some of the most common ones include:

  1. Digestive issues: Abdominal pain, bloating, gas, constipation, diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting are all common symptoms of celiac disease.
  2. Fatigue: Many people with celiac disease experience fatigue, even if they get enough sleep.
  3. Skin problems: Celiac disease can cause a rash called dermatitis herpetiformis, which causes itchy, blistering bumps on the skin.
  4. Joint pain: Joint pain and stiffness are common symptoms of celiac disease, especially in the hands and knees.
  5. Anemia: Celiac disease can cause iron-deficiency anemia, which can lead to fatigue, weakness, and shortness of breath.
  6. Weight loss: Many people with celiac disease lose weight unintentionally due to malabsorption of nutrients.
  7. Delayed growth and development: Children with celiac disease may experience delayed growth and puberty due to malabsorption of nutrients.

What to do When You Have Celiac Disease?

It’s important to note that the severity and impact of gluten intolerance can vary from person to person. Some people may experience only mild symptoms, while others may have severe symptoms that affect their daily lives.

If you suspect you have gluten intolerance, it’s important to consult a healthcare professional for the diagnosis of gluten intolerance vs. celiac and management.

What is Non-celiac Gluten Allergy?

Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is a condition in which a person experiences symptoms similar to those of celiac disease, such as bloating, abdominal pain, and diarrhea, but does not test positive for celiac disease or have the same autoimmune response as someone with celiac disease, hence the confusion of gluten intolerance vs. celiac.

Unlike celiac disease, NCGS does not damage the lining of the small intestine, but it is believed to be triggered by the consumption of gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye.

People with NCGS may experience symptoms within hours or days after consuming gluten, and their symptoms may improve when they follow a gluten-free diet.

While NCGS is a real condition, it can be difficult to diagnose because there are no specific tests or biomarkers for the condition, and some people may experience similar symptoms due to other underlying conditions.

Symptoms of Non-celiac Gluten Sensitivity

Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is a condition in which an individual experiences symptoms similar to those of celiac disease after consuming gluten-containing foods but without the intestinal inflammation and damage to the small intestine seen in celiac disease. The symptoms of NCGS can vary widely and may include:

  1. Digestive problems: This includes bloating, gas, diarrhea, constipation, abdominal pain, and nausea.
  2. Headaches: NCGS can cause headaches and migraines, which may be severe.
  3. Fatigue: NCGS can cause fatigue and weakness, which can make it difficult to perform daily activities.
  4. Brain fog: NCGS can cause cognitive problems, such as difficulty concentrating or remembering things and confusion.
  5. Joint pain: NCGS can cause joint pain and inflammation, which can be mistaken for arthritis.
  6. Skin problems: NCGS can cause skin rashes, such as eczema or psoriasis.
  7. Depression and anxiety: NCGS can cause mood changes, including depression and anxiety.
  8. Numbness or tingling: NCGS can cause numbness or tingling in the hands and feet.

What to do When You Have Non-celiac Gluten Sensitivity?

It’s important to note that not all symptoms may be present in every individual with NCGS. Some people may experience only mild symptoms, while others may have more severe symptoms.

If you suspect you have NCGS, it’s important to talk to your healthcare provider for a proper diagnosis of gluten intolerance vs. celiac and treatment.

What is Wheat Allergy

Wheat allergy is a condition in which the body’s immune system overreacts to certain proteins found in wheat. When someone with a wheat allergy eats or comes into contact with wheat, their immune system mistakenly identifies the proteins in the wheat as harmful and triggers an allergic reaction.

The symptoms of a wheat allergy can vary from mild to severe and may include:

  • Skin rash or hives
  • Itchy or swollen mouth, throat, or tongue
  • Nasal congestion or runny nose
  • Difficulty breathing or wheezing
  • Abdominal pain, nausea, or vomiting
  • Diarrhea

In some cases, a wheat allergy can lead to anaphylaxis. This severe and potentially life-threatening allergic reaction can cause difficulty breathing, a drop in blood pressure, and loss of consciousness.

The best way to manage a wheat allergy is to avoid wheat and wheat-containing products. If you suspect that you or someone you know has a wheat allergy, it’s important to see a doctor for a proper diagnosis of gluten intolerance vs. celiac vs. wheat allergy and treatment.

Symptoms of Wheat Allergy

Wheat allergy symptoms can vary from person to person and range from mild to severe. Here are some common symptoms of wheat allergy:

  1. Digestive symptoms: Some people with a wheat allergy may experience digestive symptoms such as abdominal pain, cramping, nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea after consuming wheat or wheat-containing products.
  2. Skin symptoms: Skin symptoms of wheat allergy may include hives, itching, or eczema.
  3. Respiratory symptoms: Some people with a wheat allergy may experience respiratory symptoms such as sneezing, runny nose, nasal congestion, wheezing, or difficulty breathing.
  4. Anaphylaxis: In some cases, a wheat allergy can lead to anaphylaxis, a severe and potentially life-threatening allergic reaction that can cause difficulty breathing, a drop in blood pressure, and loss of consciousness.

What to Do When You Have Wheat Allergy?

It’s important to note that wheat allergy symptoms can be similar to other food allergies or conditions, so it’s important to see a doctor for a proper diagnosis of gluten intolerance vs. celiac vs wheat allergy and treatment.

Gluten Allergy vs. Gluten Intolerance vs. Celiac vs. Wheat Allergy

gluten free flour

Gluten allergy, gluten intolerance, celiac disease, and wheat allergy are all different conditions that involve a negative reaction to components of wheat or gluten-containing foods, but they are not the same thing.

Gluten allergy, also known as wheat allergy, is a rare immune system response to proteins found in wheat. When someone with a wheat allergy consumes wheat or products containing wheat, their immune system produces an allergic reaction, which can cause symptoms such as hives, itching, swelling, difficulty breathing, and, in severe cases, anaphylaxis.

Gluten intolerance, also known as non-celiac gluten sensitivity, is a condition where consuming gluten can cause symptoms similar to those of celiac disease but without the autoimmune response or intestinal damage seen in celiac disease.

Symptoms can include bloating, abdominal pain, diarrhea, constipation, headaches, and fatigue.

Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder where the ingestion of gluten triggers an immune response that attacks the lining of the small intestine, leading to damage and inflammation. This damage can cause malabsorption of nutrients and can lead to a range of symptoms, including abdominal pain, bloating, diarrhea, weight loss, anemia, and fatigue.

Wheat allergy, celiac disease, vs gluten intolerance are often confused. Still, celiac disease is not a true allergy because it does not involve the immune system producing an IgE-mediated allergic response.

In summary, gluten allergy and wheat allergy are similar conditions that involve the immune system producing an allergic response to wheat, while celiac disease and gluten intolerance are distinct conditions that involve negative reactions to gluten but in different ways. Identifying the type of gluten intolerance vs. celiac vs. wheat allergy is crucial as it helps create a treatment roadmap.

Moreover, the interactions between gluten intolerance vs. celiac vs. wheat allergy may pose to be hard to identify. Hence, if you feel discomfort, it is best to visit a healthcare professional to identify gluten intolerance vs. celiac vs. wheat allergy that may affect your health.

Frequently Asked Questions

Can gluten allergy cause weight gain?

Some patients experience weight gain, while some lose weight due to malabsorption. Vitamin D deficiency has a visible impact on unexplainable weight fluctuation.

Is gluten sensitivity genetic?

Yes, gluten sensitivity can be genetic. If you have the condition, chances are your siblings and cousins may also have the condition.

Do probiotics help with gluten intolerance?

Yes, probiotics help reduce gluten enzymes and destroy gluten in patients. When added after a doctor’s recommendation, some best probiotics can gravitate the symptoms.

Is gluten tolerance on the rise?

There has been a noticeable rise in the cases reported for gluten intolerance. Health conditions and poor dietary choices can elevate the symptoms.

Is it possible to develop gluten intolerance later in life

Yes, many patients are diagnosed with the condition in their late thirties.

Is there a connection between gluten intolerance and hair loss?

Deteriorating health, intestinal damage, and malabsorption all contribute to hair loss.

What is the gluten intolerance vs. celiac symptoms in children?

Gluten intolerance symptoms in children

1. Headaches
2. Diarrhea
3. Distended or bloated stomach
4. Acne, rashes, or bumps
5. Dizziness
6. Brain fog
7. Joint pain, numbness or tingling

To sum it up, here is an explanation from an expert who would guide you to identify the problem.

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